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Asha of Blue

I intended writing about Asha of Blue last time but Kanan grabbed my attention, as he often does, and I was sidetracked. I apologise. So let me tell you, now, about the lead character in Book1 of the Adamadas Chronicles.
Asha was born in a cave, it is true (as her rival, Shuga Banz, liked to tell anyone would would listen) but it was the King’s Cavern and she was born a princess, third in line to the Servant’s Chair of the nation of Blue. Her father, King Jaz’n, was not xenophobic like his ancestors and was bringing his nation into the open, into friendship with the rest of The Land and the rest of the world, when he was murdered (along with his wife and their two older children) by his brother, Endor.
Asha’s Uncle Endor had spared Asha, hoping that one day she would love him but his cruelty and darkness of spirit ensured that she never would. When the child was three anos and already avoiding him, and realising that while the child lived he could never be more than a mere regent, he ordered her death. By then Endor was completely consumed by malice and the desire to control everyone around him. The King’s Cavern had deteriorated to little more than a huge cave for enslaved BlueOnes, although Endor lived in relative comfort.
Born with an intuition that both warned and terrified the little princess, Asha sensed that her uncle’s order for her to go with his vile First Officer, Helyan, was not for her good. She escaped through the bars of the cavern gates, only to be trapped on a beach fronting the Great Lake. From there she was rescued from Helyan and her evil klebs by the Blue dwarf, WindRider, and Wolgan, a gold-skinned explorer from neighbouring Ob’ronn. BlueOnes, of course, are blue – not a soft, gentle blue but vibrant like the blue ni’it, small anafa found throughout The Land.
Wolgan carried Asha to his leader, King Taran, who immediately took the tiny blue child into his care. This action dismayed his counsellor, Arll Banz, who had his own agenda concerning both his king and the nation of Blue. Banz’ only daughter, Shuga, relished any opportunity to humiliate Asha, a rival in her eyes for the affections of Queen Ithara and the princes, Daffeed and Kanan. Ithara was under the control of Banz and had little empathy for the orphan but Taran and the princes were her friends and Wolgan continued to look out for her. As well as Shuga’s endless provocation and her father’s disparagement and the Queen’s indifference, Asha was haunted by Endor’s spirit as he searched for her, seeking her death; for him to retain the Servant’s Chair she could not be allowed to see her seventeenth ano, when she would be entitled to reclaim the throne.
Asha, while blessed with good friends, was tormented by her fear of the wizard, Endor, and hurt by the tactics of Shuga and her father. Then one day King Taran realised that Asha needed a mentor who was also a guardian and he brought Tabbi the Minder into Asha’s orbit (and the orbit of his son Kanan who needed reining in at times). So the children grew strong and Asha learned to overcome her fear; it took rather longer for her to recognise manipulation and overcome that.
Shortly after her seventeenth birthday she became a queen without a throne, but a queen nevertheless. As such she stepped into a much larger world. Taran’s training had prepared her well and her own nature and belief in El’s part in both her destiny and her life gave her the strength to take up the new challenges that faced her. Some of these were much the same as any seventeen ano would face – falling in love, losing love, always pushing herself to succeed – but queens must also retain their poise if they are to have dignity in authority. The Banz duo and Endor strove to prevent her ever returning to Blue as its Queen. The LastWar broke out. Tabbi died protecting her and she knew both grief and anger but she used these emotions positively, overcame her enemies and won her true place among her peers; and, yes, she found love again.
Asha’s story is filled with diverse characters, with vibrant cultures, wonderful places and adventure. She appears now and then in subsequent Books of the Adamadas Chronicles because her greatest asset, her finest trait, is her ability to be a good friend and her friends are friends forever. On this site, adamadas.com, you will find a glossary and several maps and illustrations to expand your knowledge of The Land and its people – better still, read the book; the website provides links to several e-book outlets carrying ‘Blue’ on their e-shelves.